Posted by: Pam B. Newberry | May 4, 2014

A chance for a new hive…maybe???


Just a quick post to let you know that we may have a swarm that we might be able to capture.

Cluster of bees knocked off the tree during storm. These bees managed to rejoin the hive before the hive departed for parts unknown.

Cluster of bees knocked off the tree during storm. These bees managed to rejoin the hive before the hive departed for parts unknown.

If all works out, we’ll have a new hive!!!

Bees organizing themselves and marching into the nuc box where the Queen is now located.

Bees organizing themselves and marching into the nuc box where the Queen is now located.

Keep your fingers crossed!!!

Another swarm on 4-13-12. We were becoming experts at catching swarms.

Another swarm on 4-13-12. We were becoming experts at catching swarms.

Woohoo!
Hobbit Queen


Responses

  1. Dear Hobbit Queen, couple things to consider: Don’t wait a year to get back into bee production unless you will be taking a 90-day vacation to somewhere. Try changing from Italian to Cordovian bees. Find or grow a supply of qeens, then replace all queens at the end of July. This will give you stronger hives going into winter. Place the removed queens in NUCs to obtain any remaining eggs to bees these old queens may have. As winter comes (December in my area) insert these bees into hives for greater bee populations for winter survival. Smash old queens which have outlived useful life (declined brood pattern). Next, COLD weather protection from wind and cold may be as simple at placing a couple pallets upright with plastic/wind proof covering to protect bees from west and north winds. Lastly, develop an Intergated Pest Management Plan to include wax moth, Varroa Mites, and Small Hive Beetle which have come to US at a rapid pace. I am available for open discussion via e-mail, cunningmr@hughes.net or tel. 276-579-2123. Mickey, president, mountain empire beekeepers.
    See our website: mountainempirebeekeepers.com

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  2. I’ve been wondering how you are. Glad to hear the bees like you. I’m not surprised. Good luck on the bee swarming thing. I’m happy to hear you are still enchanted with bees. The world needs you and your bees more than ever.

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    • Hello Sandra!

      I’ve been reading your work and wondering how you were doing, too! I’d sent a request to connect via LinkedIn, as well.
      Check out my author website at pambnewberry.com and my book publishing website at jkbrookspublishibg.com. I finally got my first book published; it is a memoir. I’m now working on my first novel, The Fire Within. If all goes well, the Lord is willing, and the creek don’t rise, I hope to have it published by mid-June.

      Honey bee life will get better and we hope to get our apiary up and going again next year!
      Cheers,
      Hobbit Queen

      Like

  3. Those photos look really promising! Good luck with your swarm, and we will be praying for your success! Thanks for your photos. They are very encouraging to us! Fred and Roxy, F&R Apiary, Max Meadows, VA.

    Sent from my iPhone

    >

    Like

    • Thanks Roxy and Fred…Sadly, it didn’t work out. By the time Hobbit King to the swarm, it had begun to move…tornado affect and all!
      Side note: The pictures were taken last summer when we caught over six swarms.

      Take care and hope your hives are fairing well!
      Cheers,
      Hobbit Queen

      Like

  4. Good Luck, Pam. Hope it happens for you!

    Cheers!

    Like

    • Hello! Sorry, it didn’t happen! We’ll get a hive at some point.
      Cheers!

      Like


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